Melting temperatures

Melting temperatures for plastic 1 until 6

  1. PET
    Around 150-180°C. You need to be very careful. Do not go above 250°C because it will start releasing hydrocarbons & aldehyds. Also you want to be very careful with the PET you use. Make sure that there is absolutely no water at all because it will simply brake the polymer bonds and your output will 100% time brake. Advise to preheat the PET at around 70-80°C to eliminate the persistant water
  2. HDPE
    For instands milk bottles & bottle caps. Around 120°C. Milk bottles have a Black Carbon sheet between 2 HDPE sheets so the results is a bit yucky & not 100% HDPE… for bottle caps, it works very well !!! Do not go higher than 200°C because of release of hydrocarbons, aldehyds,  ketone & volatile fatty acid
  3. PVC
    Don’t work with PVC
  4. LDPE
    Around 105°C; when your LDPE is melted (it reduces a tons so you need to do couple batchs for a compression), i reckon you should wrap it in the next batch so the first batch doesn’t burn from too long contact on the heat-conductant metal it is melting on.Do not go higher than 200°C because of release of hydrocarbons, aldehyds,  ketone & volatile fatty acid
  5. PP
    Do not go higher than 200°C because of release of hydrocarbons, aldehyds,  ketone & volatile fatty acid
  6. PS
    Only work with Cristal PS, not expanded PS. Around  210°C. From the testing, i have experienced many different fume releases depending on the type of cristal PS used. As of temperature awarenessDo not go higher than 250°C because of release of hydrocarbons, aldehyds,  styrene and its oligomers.